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Outstanding Mythological Charcoal Drawing of  Chiron and Asclepius  on a Three Leaf Screen
Outstanding Mythological Charcoal Drawing of  Chiron and Asclepius  on a Three Leaf Screen
Outstanding Mythological Charcoal Drawing of  Chiron and Asclepius  on a Three Leaf Screen
 
Outstanding Mythological Charcoal Drawing of  Chiron and Asclepius  on a Three Leaf Screen
Outstanding Mythological Charcoal Drawing of  Chiron and Asclepius  on a Three Leaf Screen
Outstanding Mythological Charcoal Drawing of  Chiron and Asclepius  on a Three Leaf Screen
 
Outstanding Mythological Charcoal Drawing of  Chiron and Asclepius  on a Three Leaf Screen
Outstanding Mythological Charcoal Drawing of  Chiron and Asclepius  on a Three Leaf Screen
Outstanding Mythological Charcoal Drawing of  Chiron and Asclepius  on a Three Leaf Screen
 
Outstanding Mythological Charcoal Drawing of  Chiron and Asclepius  on a Three Leaf Screen

Outstanding Mythological Charcoal Drawing of Chiron and Asclepius on a Three Leaf Screen

A superb and of great proportions, mid 20th century charcoal drawing of a mythological scene with Chiron and Asclepius on a three-leaf screen.
Wonderful artwork , this screen will make a great statement in any wall.
Paris Circa 1960s

Measurements : 282cm Wide (fully open) x 120cm Wide (middle section) x 80cm Wide (the two sides)

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Ref: 15242


Dimensions
210.5 cms High (82.1 inches)


 
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ASKLEPIOS (Asclepius) was the god of medicine. He was also the patron god, and reputed ancestor, of the Asklepiades (Asclepiades), the ancient guild of doctors.

Asklepios was the son of Apollon and the Trikkaian (Triccaean) princess Koronis (Coronis). His mother died in labour and when she was laid out on the pyre, Apollon cut the unborn child from her womb. From this Asklepios received his name which means "to cut open." Asklepios was raised by the centaur Kheiron (Chiron) who instructed him in the art of medicine. He grew so skilled in the craft that he was able to restore the dead to life. This was a crime against the natural order and so Zeus destroyed him with a thunderbolt.

After his death Asklepios was placed amongst the stars as the constellationOphiochus ("the Serpent Holder"). Some say his mother was also set in the heavens as Corvus, the crow (korônê in Greek). Asklepios' apotheosis into godhood occurred at the same time. He was sometimes identified with Homer's Paion (Paeon), the physician of the gods.

Asklepios was depicted as a kindly, bearded man holding a serpent-entwined staff. Although he is largely absent from ancient Greek vase painting, statues of the god are quite common.


KHEIRON (Chiron) was eldest and wisest of the Kentauroi (Centaurs), a Thessalian tribe of half-horse men. Unlike his brethren Kheiron was an immortal son of the Titan Kronos (Cronus)and a half-brother of Zeus. When Kronos' tryst with the nymphe Philyra was interrupted by Rhea, he transformed himself into a horse to escape notice and the result was this two-formed son.

The rest of the Kentauroi (Centaurs) were spawned by the cloud Nephele on the slopes of Mount Pelion in Magnesia where they were nursed by the daughters of Kheiron.

Kheiron was a renowned teacher who mentored many of the greatest heroes of myth including the Argonauts Jason and Peleus, the physician Asklepios (Asclepius), the demi-god Aristaios (Aristaeus) and Akhilleus (Achilles) of Troy.

The old Kentauros was accidentally wounded by Herakles when the hero was battling other members of the tribe. The wound, poisoned with Hydra-venom, was incurable, and suffering unbearable pain Kheiron voluntarily relinquished his immortality. Zeus then placed him amongst the stars as the constellation Sagittarius or Centaurus.

In ancient Greek vase painting Kheiron was often depicted with a form quite distinct from that of the other Kentauroi--he had the full body of a man, from head to foot, with a partial horse-body attached to his rump, and was clothed in a full-length chiton and boots. This unusual form might simply reflect his appearance in Greek drama where costume-limitations required a simplication of the centaurine-form. The other Kentauroi, who do not appear in Athenian drama, were depicted unclothed and with fully equine forms below the waist.

Kheiron's name was derived from the Greek word for hand (kheir) and meant something like "skilled with the hands." In myth it was also closely associated with the word kheirourgos "surgeon."
 

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