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Antique French Antiques

 
Late 18th Century French Directoire Period Semainier
Late 18th Century French Directoire Period Semainier
Late 18th Century French Directoire Period Semainier
 
Late 18th Century French Directoire Period Semainier
Late 18th Century French Directoire Period Semainier
Late 18th Century French Directoire Period Semainier
 
Late 18th Century French Directoire Period Semainier
Late 18th Century French Directoire Period Semainier
Late 18th Century French Directoire Period Semainier
 
Late 18th Century French Directoire Period Semainier

Late 18th Century French Directoire Period Semainier

Late 18th century French mahogany semainier with six drawers and a tambour sliding door , enclosing a fixed shelve.
The four tapering feet with gilt bronze hooves.
Great proportions.
France Directoire Period

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Ref: 15012


Dimensions
185 cms High (72.2 inches)
53.5 cms Wide (20.9 inches)
41 cms Deep (16.0 inches)


 
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French Directoire Period ( 1789-1804 ) from the French Furniture Book by Sylvie Chadenet:

This fifteen year period was the most troubled in French history. Everything associated with the old regime - royal luxury, aristocratic power and privilege- was condemned. The revolutionaries of this time suppressed the furniture guilds, which could no longer guarantee the level of craftsmanship. On the other hand, the growing number of personal fortunes led to an increase in demand. However, the limited sophistication of the new clients made them less than exacting: they were often satisfied with surface glitter and placed a high priority on rapid execution. Only after Bonaparte's seizure of power would France again cultivate a grand style.
Most furniture from the period was solid wood: elm, walnut, fruitwood, or beech. Only luxury work was made of solid and carved mahogony. Painted pieces, usually made of beech, were common (gray, white, sea green, lime green). There was a revival of inlay decoration, using ebony, citronnier, copper and brass. Marquetry was almost totally absent due to economic restraints. Bronze fittings became rare.
 

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